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Norfolk: Winterton

Kelly's Directory for Cambridgeshire, Norfolk & Suffolk 1883

[Transcription copyright © Paddy Apling]

WINTERTON is a parish and fishing village 1 mile north of Hemsby station on the Eastern and Midlands railway, about 8 miles north-by-west from Yarmouth and 21 from Norwich, in the Northern division of the county, incorporated hundreds of East and West Flegg, county court district of Great Yarmouth, rural deanery of Flegg and archdeaconry and diocese of Norwich.

The church of Holy Trinity and All Saints was built in the early part of the fifteenth century and was in 1878 thoroughly restored and re-seated, to hold 230 persons; the greater part of the expense was borne by Mrs. Burnley Hume, in memory of Joseph Hume, who resided at Burnley Hall, to whom there is a tablet: the work was carried out from designs drawn by Mr. Herbert Green, the architect, of Norwich and London: it is a structure of stone, and has chancel, nave, aisles, porch and parvise, with a fine embattled square tower, 127 feet high, commanding a fine view of the ocean: the church and tower were again restored in 1883. The register dates from about the year 1717. The living is a rectory, with the chapelry of East Somerton annexed; the tithes are commuted at £544 11s. 8d. with 30 acres of glebe and house, in the gift of and held since 1867 by the Rev. William Green M.A. of Trinity College, Cambridge.

The Hundred river has reversed its course, and now flows from the sea instead of into it at this place. There is a coastguard station. In 1859 a surf boat was placed here by the National Life Boat Institution. Here is a lighthouse, situated on elevated ground, the tower nearly 70 feet high and illuminated by a prismatic reflector.

About 150 fishermen are employed in the herring and mackerel fisheries. Winterton had a market and fair, which have long been obsolete.

Hill House is the seat of Mrs. Hume, and has very fine ranges of hot-houses and conservatories. The chief landowners are the Earl of Winterton, who is lord of the manor, F. Charsley esq. and Mrs. Hume.

The soil is light; subsoil, gravel and sand. The chief crops are wheat, oats and barley. The parish comprises 1,273 acres of land, exclusive of a large extent of sea-beach and warren; rateable value, £1,649; the population in 1881 was 749.

WINTERTON NESS, now locally known as HUMESHEAD, and one of the chief promontories on the east coast, is within this parish, and a most dangerous part of the coast. The Trinity Board, in 1850, at the request of the late Joseph Hume esq. M.P. the financial reformer, placed a buoy on it. The coast is very dangerous to shipping, and in ancient times the right to wreckage was appurtenant to the manor, and was a subject of dispute between the Abbot of St. Benet's-at-Holme and the Prior of Norwich. The right to wreckage is the subject of a letter from William Peacock steward to Sir John Paxton, the lord of the manor (19th Nov. 1477), published in the Paston letters.

_____

POST & MONEY ORDER OFFICE & Savings Bank.-- Mrs. Ann Bullock, receiver. Letters from Yarmouth arrive at 8.30 a.m.; dispatched at 5 p.m. Martham is the nearest telegraph office.

Coast Guard Station, -- Barry, officer in charge

SCHOOLS:--

CARRIER TO YARMOUTH. -- Thomas Smith, daily

Green Rev. William M.A. [rector]
Hume Mrs. Hill house
Wilton George, Church cottage

Annison James, thatcher
Bould Edwd. Rt. farmer, Winterton hall
Brown Maurice, grocer & carpenter
Bullock Ann (Mrs.), market gardener, & post office
Empson James, farmer
Empson James, jun. farmer
George Isaiah, shopkeeper
George Philip, carrier to Yarmouth
George Walter, shopkeeper
Goffin Robert, grocer
Hewitt James, baker
Johnson George, farmer
King James, Three Mariners
Page Thomas, bricklayer
Smith Thomas, carrier
Starling George Davey, miller (wind), farmer & assistant overseer
Waite James, Fisherman's Return


See also the Winterton parish page.

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Copyright © Mike Bristow.
January 2001