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Norfolk: Fishley

William White's History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Norfolk 1883

[Transcription copyright © Pat Newby]

FISHLEY, 7½ miles W.N.W. of Yarmouth, is an ancient parish, united with Upton for parochial and school purposes; is in Walsham hundred, Blofield union, Norwich county court and bankruptcy districts, Blofield polling district of South Norfolk, Blofield and Walsham petty sessional division, Blofield rural deanery, and Norwich archdeaconry. It had 23 inhabitants in 1881, living on 476 acres of land.

Fishley old hall stood on a site nearer the church than the present hall, to which the church was probably a private chapel. The hall belongs to Miss Edwards, of Hardingham.

The CHURCH (St. Mary) is a small but pretty structure of Early English architecture, and was very effectually restored by Miss Edwards in 1861, at her own expense. It consists of nave, chancel, south porch with Norman door, and circular embattled tower with one bell. The pulpit, reading desk, and font are handsome, and the seats are open benches with poppy-heads. The east window is filled with stained glass in memory of the late Rev. Edward Marsham; and here is a harmonium. During the restoration, three stone coffin-lids, with floriated crosses upon them, were found, which are now in the churchyard.

The rectory, valued in the King's Book at £5, is in the patronage of Miss Edwards, and incumbency of the Rev. D.T. Barry, B.A. The glebe is 4A. 2R. 25P., and the tithes were commuted in 1841 for £165. 12s. There is a Rectory, built by Miss Edwards in 1874.

A railway station at Acle, ¾ mile distant.

POST from Norwich, via Acle. Nearest Money Order and Telegraph Office at Acle.

	Barry   Rev. D.T., B.A.   the Rectory
	Read    Henry             farmer, Fishley hall

See also the Fishley parish page.

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Copyright © Pat Newby.
September 1999